When Gadgets Attack

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When Gadgets Attack

Postby TeMerc » Sat Aug 09, 2008 10:20 am

By Dan Goodin in Las Vegas
Published Saturday 9th August 2008 13:02 GMT

A well-known researcher specializing in website security has strongly criticized safety on Google, arguing the world's biggest search engine needlessly puts its millions of users at risk.

At issue is Google's policy of hosting untested third-party applications that users can automatically embed into personalized Google home pages. During a talk titled "Xploiting Google Gadgets: Gmalware & Beyond," Hansen and fellow researcher Tom Stracener laid out a variety of attacks that can be unleashed using the programs.

The most devastating is the ability of Google gadgets to immediately redirect victims who log into iGoogle.com to a page under the control of an attacker. This creates a phishing hazard, particularly for less tech-savvy users who don't know to check the browser bar. Even if they do, the bar shows up at gmodules.com, an address many mistakenly believe is safe because it is maintained by Google.

Google gadgets make other attacks possible, including: the ability to:
  • carry out port scanning on a victim's internal network to conduct surveillance
  • use cross-site request forgery techniques to force victim PCs to follow links to malicious sites (for instance, those that host child pornography) and
  • cause a victim's browser to access a home router and change domain name system server addresses or other sensitive settings
Hansen and Stracener acknowledged that in-the-wild attacks that use Google gadgets are rare, but they said that's likely to change.

"Once money actually starts flowing through, once the financial incentive for malware exists, then you're going to start seeing more of this type of thing pop up," Stracener said.

nwz Continued @ The Register
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